Looking for Obvious and Not-so-Obvious Problems 

Why is business development problematic for smaller firms? I hear the following misconceptions regularly:

*  Something else is always more urgent.

*  I’m fine when I get in front of a prospect – I just need more leads.

*  I have plenty of business right now – I don’t need any more.

*  The firm hasn’t needed it up to now.

*  There are only so many hours in the day.

Everyone has well-worn paths in the brain that make change hard. For example, consider the pattern of how you go about your work each day. Do you do the same things and have the same habits? What’s your first thought when you get out of bed? Is it:

*  How on earth am I going to get everything done today?

*  How can I make sure that my largest customer doesn’t cancel its contract?

*  How can I find time to write that proposal for a new prospect?(

*  How can I pay for the supplies the business needs?

Take a step back to examine your own business from a different perspective:

If your day-to-day life looks like the above, you’re in survival mode, doing only whatever seems most urgent. Maybe you’re juggling a lot of urgent issues and you only give your customers and your business development attention when you’re about to run out of business. That’s like giving your life partner the time of day only when they throw a tantrum or threaten to leave you.

Don’t make the mistake of saying that business development is getting little time because you’re very busy with customers, you love administration or you’re always facing a higher priority. There is no higher priority than business development!

 

Look for our next blog examining: Be proactive rather than reactive